Baby's First Christmas Dinner Place SettingPlanning and anticipating the food we'll eat at Christmas time is a big part of the holiday season and there's no reason why our baby foodies should miss out on the enjoyment. Baby's first Christmas is a special moment to cherish forever so our goal is to keep them happy, especially at meal time when you have a table surrounded by family and friends. If your baby is between 6-12 months and has been introduced to solid foods already then you'll find recipes and nutritional guidelines below to help create a festive Christmas dinner your baby will drool over (not just teething drool!).

There are lots of fabulous baby food books on the market today that help parents introduce foods in the right order, provide recipes, cooking and storage tips, and inform us on different approaches such as purees or baby-led weaning. Mommy instincts will play a big role in this process too, but no matter what book, website or friendly advice you choose to follow, there are certain nutritional requirements that need to be met.

The Government of Canada recommends the following nutritional guidelines for an infant 6 to 12 months:

  • Continue to breastfeed for up to two years or more, as long as both you and your child want to.
  • Continue to give your breastfed infant a vitamin D supplement.
  • At 6 months, breastfeeding is still your baby's main food source but it is time to begin adding solid foods. Formula-fed infants should also be introduced to solids at this time.
  • Start with foods that contain iron and offer them a few times a day (Ex. beef, fish, legumes, iron-fortified infant cereal).
  • Gradually increase the number of times a day that you offer solid foods.
  • Offer your baby a range of nutritious foods from your family meals.
  • Give your baby foods they can eat using their hands. Offer pieces of soft-cooked vegetables, soft fruit such as banana, grated cheese, and toast.
  • If you are making the transition to cow milk as your child's main milk source, wait until your baby is between 9 and 12 months old and start with homogenized cow milk (3.25% M.F.).
  • If you are going to make fortified soy beverage your child's main milk source, wait until they are 2 years of age. Rice or nut beverages should not be used as your child's main milk source.
  • Pay attention to your baby's hunger cues. Trust you child to decide how much they are going to eat at any meal.

Assortment of Baby Purees

Christmas Dinner Recipes

Turkey & Potato Puree

  1. Shave off a slice of roasted turkey (no salt if possible) and put it in a food processor.
  2. Add a few chunks of boiled or roasted potato to the food processor.
  3. Add a tablespoon (or more if desired) of liquid such as water, no-salt chicken stock, or breast milk to thin the puree.
  4. Blend everything together to desired texture.

*For older babies, give the slice of roasted turkey as finger food and blend some of your cooked Christmas vegetables into a puree to offer as dip.

Butternut Squash & Apple Puree

  1. Steam a cup of cubed, peeled squash until soft and put it in a food processor.
  2. Steam a cup of sliced apple until soft and add it to the food processor. Do not steam these two together because the squash will take longer than the apple.
  3. Blend everything together to desired texture.

*This will be a smooth and sweet dish sure to please. Add less apple if you want to minimize the natural sugar and try sprinkling this puree with a little cinnamon to broaden baby's taste.

Cranberry & Pear Puree

  1. Steam two cups of sliced pear and one cup of cranberries until soft and put it in a food processor.
  2. Add one cup of water or breast milk plus half a teaspoon of cloves to the food processor.
  3. Blend everything together to desired texture.

*For older babies, offer this tangy puree as a dip for sliced roasted turkey or chicken.

Chunky Brussels Sprouts & Parsnips

  1. Steam, roast or fry 6-12 Brussels sprouts and put them in a food processor.
  2. Add a few chunks of steamed or roasted parsnips to the food processor.
  3. Add a tablespoon of liquid such as water, no-salt chicken stock, or breast milk.
  4. Pulse everything together to desired texture.

 *This can be a chunkier puree for older babies. If you'd like to make it smooth just add more liquid and blend longer. Try substituting cooked peas or potato instead of parsnips.

Stuffing Balls

  1. Add 4 slices of bread and a pinch of thyme to a food processor and pulse until you have fine breadcrumbs.
  2. Melt a teaspoon of butter in a pan and saute one small onion (finely chopped) and one stalk of celery (finely chopped).
  3. Combine the breadcrumbs with the sauteed veggies and add 2 tablespoons of no-salt chicken stock. Mix well.
  4. Spoon the stuffing mixture onto a greased baking sheet and bake with your other Christmas dishes for around 15-20 mins until golden on top.

*These stuffing balls are great finger food and make perfect year round side dishes for baby-led weaning.

For other great recipes and resources check out the following sites: